What kind of expenses am I expected to incur when entering into a Retail Lease?

We get this question a lot and it’s a tough one to answer! Not because we can’t – it’s just difficult to answer such a general question. There is no hard and fast answer to this question as it will depend on a large number of factors. In addition to rent, there are all sorts of costs that you would have to incur when you enter into a Retail Lease. These are both ongoing or one-off. Generally however you would incur the following outgoings:

  • Rent
  • Water Rates
  • Local Council Rates
  • Land Tax
  • Electricity Rates
  • Local Council Parking Levies (if premises offer council parking)
  • Local Council Outdoor Seating License (if premises have outdoor seating)
  • Public Liability Insurance
  • Glass Replacement Insurance
  • Building Administrative and Maintenance Fees(if premises is part of strata)
  • Marketing Fees (if premises is part of a larger shopping complex)

Outgoings will change depending on:

  • Floor space
  • Location
  • Value of the premises
  • Equipment on the premises
  • What you are doing

The above is a non-exhaustive list of matters. As stated there is no hard and fast answer to “what is expected” and “how much” it is expected to cost as these matters will change depending on where you want to lease. This is a matter for homework and you’ll likely get these answers once you’ve properly investigated the location of where you want to lease. But this isn’t a chicken and egg dilemma – in NSW the Retail Leases Act says that the landlord of retail premises must issue a “disclosure statement” to all potential lessees that sets out what these costs are before the lessee enters into the lease agreement.

Retail Leases can be complex – if you are entering into one, give us a call and we’ll guide you through the process and assist you with your transaction.

Shareholders’ Agreements and Company Constitutions

We have previously written about Shareholder’s Agreementsand what they are. A Shareholder’s Agreement is certainly very important as it deals what each shareholder brings to the table, and more importantly, what happens when there is a disagreement or if a shareholder wants to exit the business. Not having a Shareholder’s Agreement will┬álikely make the exit process more difficult. However what a Shareholder’s Agreement cannot do is to determine how the company is run, who has the day to day responsibilities, who the directors are, and the conduct of board meetings. These are all matters dictated by the Company Constitution.

The Constitution has the effect of an agreement between the company, its members, its directors, and its secretary. A company adopts a Constitution on registration or after registration. If no particular Constitution has been adopted after registration, a default set of rules called the Replacable Rules. These rules are found in the Corporations Act and they deal with a number of topics including:

  • Company Officers and Employees
  • Meetings of Directors
  • Powers of Directors
  • Voting, Resolutions, and Quorums.
  • Meetings of Members
  • Transmissions of Shares on Death or Bankrupcy

A Company can replace some of the Replacable Rules with its own rules or adopt its own Constitution so long as a special resolution has been passed by its Shareholders. If a member is not satisfied with the way the company is being run, and if the company is being run in contravention of its own Constitution, they may be able to bring legal action against the offending member.

A well-run business involving more than one partner should always have both a Shareholder’s Agreement and a Company Constitution.